Joanna Conom… Salish Sea

 

Salish sea

crusted with black glass
speckled with color
of distant running lights
tonight cracks only
to accept their burden
easy going appendage
of the world wet
reacts to insults of earth or sky
so rarely gently
it gives no hint
of changing season
or reason it does
not warm or long caress
human flesh
will cool a person
fast back to its maker
as fast in july as
on a merry christmas
a cold and quiet sea
my home
 

Copyright © 2017 by Joanna Conom

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Carrie Albert… Frog Artifact, named “Beatrice”

 

beatrice_amphivbiaremnantslab

 
 
Frog Artifact, named “Beatrice”
(3016 Analysis)
 
Mass and Materials:
Of blue petrochemicals, spots intact.
Palm size with “China 1” underbelly
found on earth under far-Eastern
impact of Asteroid Zabo
 
Dated:
Early Plastic Age, before World War 3
on the eve of Meltdown Z when
memories were buried
all religious faiths annihilated
100 years prior to extinction
of living amphibians
 
Explanation:
Goddess Anura, likely a fertility charm used
in Laboratory Zigmar’s early attempts
to procreate human/frog beings
 
Stunning survival, but needs bath and shining
 
Hold in Goddess Vaults 100z456890000//
 

Carrie Albert is poet and visual artist and sometimes the two merge. Her poetry has appeared in diverse journals and anthologies – recently – the Bullies and Bystanders Project: “Changing Harm to Harmony”, HEArt online and upcoming (with photo) in Gray Sparrow, both print and online. Collage, photo and poem pairings have been featured in a number of publications. Here are a few links: Carrie Albert | The Far Field, Carrie Albert — The Monarch Review, Spiritual & Healing Practices – all things healing, qarrtsiluni.com/tag/c-albert. She is also Artist in Residence at inksweatandtears.co.uk. online.

Copyright © 2016 by Carrie Albert

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Margaret Roncone… I’m Going to Moscow

 

I’m Going to Moscow

 

to trudge through snow

I will continue until

steeple clocks

stop chiming

I will wear

scratchy shirts

read Tolstoy

find his orchard

take a bite of a wormy apple

offer the rest to a sleigh driver

in a topcoat

his red worn hands

at the reins of a
horse
I will steal.

 

Margaret Roncone was born in Rochester N.Y., found her hearthome in Seattle. Wrote poetry in high school and was encouraged by a lay teacher surrounded by a swarm of nuns. Finds inspiration in frequent bus rides; hosts an open mic in Uptown.

Copyright © 2016 by Margaret Roncone

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret Roncone… I’m Still Dreaming of your Birthday

 

I’m Still Dreaming of your Birthday

empty flower vases,
burnt cake,
useless gifts wrapped in old

newsprint

I could have done so much better

have no excuse,

except for childhood memories
hanging like rat traps

from my fingers,

we are heavy souls
made heavier

with the past;

I walk through cold streams
trying to wake myself.

 

Margaret Roncone was born in Rochester N.Y., found her hearthome in Seattle. Wrote poetry in high school and was encouraged by a lay teacher surrounded by a swarm of nuns. Finds inspiration in frequent bus rides; hosts an open mic in Uptown.

Copyright © 2016 by Margaret Roncone

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher J. Jarmick… Re-Brand (part 2 of 2)

 

Re-Brand (part 2 of 2)

But a part of me can’t help thinking the Native Americans
have again received glass beads for something worth much more

than realized.

I mean last week, I heard a local Seattle newscaster
refer to the Washington NFL football team as the Redskins
even though that word has been declared as derogatory as

using the N word.

But no one seemed to notice. There was no controversy, no suspension,
no firing or even an editorial in the paper.
Perhaps it’s because we are Washington State and have college and
NFL teams that some might confuse, if not delineated clearly
from that R Team in the other Washington.
And the NFL is a religion completely with a
Church of Monday Night Football – so they can follow
other rules since they answer to the highest power.

(and by this I mean of course: Money.)

Seattle and Minneapolis are in truth, just the latest cities to join the
growing movement. 16 States already don’t recognize Columbus Day,

and South Dakota has since 1990, celebrated Native Day.

Yet school boards have also done a good thing, a very good thing.
In Seattle, Portland and in many other schools, in many other places
Indigenous Day supplements, Columbus Day in the spirit of generous cooperation.
So relax, Columbus Day Mattress Sale Signs won’t have to be re-done after all.
We’ve done a good thing here in Silicon Valley Northwest
Nothing disingenuous occurring here at all.
Oh no… It’s a good thing, a very good thing indeed!
Chief Seattle and I feel better already,
don’t you?

 

Copyright © 2015 by Christopher J. Jarmick

 

 

 

Explanation: The Seattle City Council officially proclaimed that the 2nd Monday in October is now Indigenous Day instead of Columbus Day. Several cities have already passed similar measures and at least 16 states don’t recognize Columbus Day. 1n 1892 on the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ landing in the Bahamas in 1492 President Benjamin Harrison established Columbus Day. It started being celebrated on the second October Monday in 1971, though today 16 states including Alaska, Hawaii and Oregon don’t recognize Columbus Day as a public holiday. Since 1990 South Dakota has celebrated Native American Day. Previously at the state level in Washington (and elsewhere) efforts were made to create Honor Day to Honor Native Americans on May 13th but no legislation has passed to officially recognize that day. Absolutely there should be a special day giving respect and honor to Native Americans. It should be more important than something that school boards see as a supplement to Columbus Day or that cities are able to proclaim in the same way they hand out keys to honor notable citizens. I don’t think Native Americans should settle for something you can consider in a glass half full sort of way as a good step in the right direction. Poets by the way have a celebratory Month every April maybe the least that could be done is to declare November, Native American Month, and make the Friday after Thanksgiving Indigenous Day.