Jared Pearce… Prognostication

 

Prognostication

On the day you came home
I am hustling one place
To another, sweating on
The air that won’t lift and won’t breathe,
 
And there are three blue jays
In the oak up third, younger,
I think, and quieter, chuffing
Softly and letting me near,
 
Fanning their tails to match
The blistered sky, looking askance
As I perambulate by. I hope
They’ll stay and believe
 
In the love and the need in me.
Yet the blue in them wasn’t heaven’s
Grace, but the blue of your eye,
The blue of deep space,
 
And without a shout, without
A race, they spread the day and hurtled away,
With nothing of cruelty
And nothing of hate.
 

Some of Jared Pearce’s poems have recently been or will soon be shared in Marathon, A Quiet Courage, DIAGRAM, Inlandia, and Poetic Diversity. His first collection is due from Aubade Press in 2018. He lives in Iowa.

 

Copyright © 2017 by Jared Pearce

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Purple Mark… The Gathering

 

The Gathering

In lavish circles whirling, they skittered over the water top
weird women flying, their snarls and tatters streaming,
laughing profanely like bawds.
 
It wasn’t All Hallows Eve or any occasion that those
who weren’t these Witches would know. Yet it was an occasion
for them as their little ones were beginning their way in the Craft.
 
Seven of them stood wide-eyed as the Circle was cast.
They were smudged and invited within the muddy Sacred space
as the Spring rains continued to come down to soak the Earth.
 
The Quarters were called and they each in turn faced
the High Priestess’s Athamé and intoned the words they had
long rehearsed to be perfect on this most important occasion.
 
Despite the rain’s fall they were glad that they were now a part
of the Sacred Sisterhood. The cakes and ale which followed
made them feel that they were indeed growing up
 
and on the way to attaining the wisdom which had passed
from Mother to Daughter for so many generations that
their lines were lost in the mists of memory.
 
As soon as the last cake was eaten and the last of the ale sipped,
the Quarters were thanked and the Circle opened and the Witches
old and new dispersed to the four corners of their town.
 
Rain fell softly on the town cupolas, chuckled from rain-spouts
and spoke in strange subterranean tongues beneath the windows
of the town which had no idea of the importance of the evening.
 

Purple Mark aka Mark Wirth courts way too many Muses: Chocolate-Making, Costuming, Millinery, Photography, Painting, Drawing, Novel-Writing and Poetry. In College, he was the Art Director for the MSU Literary Annual for 2 years and an issue of Scimitar: Illustrations, Layout and some Poetry. In the Seattle area, he worked on Mythos in a like manner and provided additional photography as well as short stories.

 

Copyright © 2012 by Purple Mark

 
 
 
 
 
 

Rajnish Mishra… Sic semper [evello mortem] tyrannis

 

Sic semper [evello mortem] tyrannis

 
‘Still waters run deep’.
 
Clichés are good to begin a poem with.
I love justice and hate tyranny.
I love justice more than
I love my country, its people, my people, fame or wealth.
Sometimes, truth sounds clichéd.
 
Quid est veritas?
 
At first it seems not easy,
not quite, but then, as it’s natural to kill, so natural,
in fact, that they need to write,
sometimes on stone, sometimes on paper:
‘Thou shalt not kill!’
 
Thou shalt have no other gods before Me.
 
He rose high, and masses called him God.
He’s not alone, but caput gone triumvirate kaput.
It’s unnerving to feel within – a fierce, feral,
beast, unnamed and ferocious, rise and fill
all the space up under the skin
of a citizen: civilized, harmless and tamed.
 
Hoi polloi
 
The masses, sheep, sons and daughters of apes,
imitate, submit, follow and yield liberty
to tyrants, despots, usurpers with power,
for their patch of pasture or bunch of bananas.
 
‘But here I am to speak what I do know’
 
I am an honorable man, not a butcher.
You are an honorable man, no accomplice.
We are all honorable and good men.
They are not honorable.
 
Ehyeh asher Ehyeh.
 
You are what you are,
and masses are ‘them’, not ‘us’.
Strangely though, it’s them, not you,
who lust for blood tonight, my blood.
Bloodthirsty sheep? Lion-apes? Always?
 
‘Fearful symmetry’
 
Tiger’s fire is sheep’s death.
Thy blood my brother bought death for me;
Thy blood ‘cries out’ to them ‘from the soil’
brings vengeance, seven fold,
Insane at night, sane at dawn.
No, Caesar never cried ‘Et tu Brute’,
nor I ‘Sic semper evello mortem tyrannis’.
 

Rajnish Mishra is a poet, writer, translator and blogger born and brought up in Varanasi, India. He is the editor of PPP Ezine, a poetry ezine. He has a blog on poetry, poetics and aesthetic pleasure: https:/poetrypoeticspleasure.wordpress.com.

 

Copyright © 2017 by Rajnish Mishra

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ahmed R Teleb… This Dance

 

This Dance

so long here and now
beginning a waltz
perhaps to foxtrot
around a rumba
 
front to front
Axum Indian Sea
back to back
when legs bachata an ocean
salsa a sly river
 
shoulder side to side
fingertips, sides, knuckles
fists, elbows kiss keys
 
downshifted thighs up
continental divides
–so here thought, like a bird flies back
        if right–
rocky green and ocean blue
 
leg leg                        measure globe
compass metronome
infinitesimals
mini-huge studio
 
sing improbable colors
salseo, ando six rivers
for this dance
 
james garcia mohamed brown
twists turns, against themselves
to know no moves
 
forever (in)finite
        (open)circle
note to note
        a ka-kosmos
 
a river-ocean studio dance
knowing tiny forever
long too short
with no moves
 
again
 

Copyright © 2017 by Ahmed R Teleb

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Robert Ronnow… Not like a figwort

 
 

Not like a figwort

Not like a figwort but not an aster, either. Could he be a buttercup
with sepals, no petals, but sepals like petals? Alan is a bluebeech,
an ash if his books sell. Quick shake hands. Zach’s bald ok, a
magnolia, cone-like fruits a bridge to his neanderthal father.
When did Ben become a chestnut lover? It’s said women are practical
but there’s much variation in their leaves, ovaries. Many are older,
stumps, snags for peckers and porcupines, teachers, feeders, seeders.
What did the wood thrush sing
                                                   teaching its young thrush meanings?
 
Sometimes a mushroom. Did you know such fungi are mostly protein?
Mushrooms could replace meat, and the dead, the dead’s feet, white
as pyrola, could replace the living. Well, we worry. Will we bad luck
be extinguished. Denizens of convenience stores think who cares, will
I beat the reaper? Hope sempiternally springs. Things rarely clear
as sun among the sundews. Eating huckleberries from your kayak.
What Paulinaq says is live your life and then your death until nothing’s left.
Then thou shalt be bereft
                                       of the heavy sackcloth of the soil, soul.
 
Said to Mrs. Buckthorn good poets imitate great poets steal.
I think she’s more an apple tree. Or pear. Good to eat,
amenable to loving. Rose or Ericaceae the differences make the
difference. Emerson and Rylin Malone are dead. The dead
are dumb, the dust won’t speak. And this deep, dull and dark
blessing’s a horizontal reserve. Moonlit. Mr. Hickory is actually a yellow birch,
holy and exfoliating. Busy spilling seed on the surface of the snow.
Teaching essay
                                 writing, algebra, earth science, branches of government.
 
I would be a cypress, cedar, branches calligraphy brushes, divorced from desert.
It takes a divorce for one to know one knows no one not only one’s wife
but your very sons who will always choose the open flower bud.
Good, as they should. Their bones are your bones, strange bones, and a
strange selection of their words. They are Uvularia sessifolia (wild oats)
and Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal). They outlast the holocaust
or not, they’re made of matter. These windows need a good cleaning.
Leaf-raking. Dusting for ghosts. Ah, sweet peace, perfect rest, there are
no ghosts
                 adults are trees, teens are shrubs, and children are herbaceous.
 
 

Robert Ronnow’s most recent poetry collections are New & Selected Poems: 1975-2005 (Barnwood Press, 2007) and Communicating the Bird (Broken Publications, 2012). Visit his web site at http://www.ronnowpoetry.com.

 

Copyright © 2017 by Robert Ronnow