About randomlyaccessedpoetics

William James Lindberg is more of a word musician than a page poet. The experience of words oscillating through his bones is the kindling that feeds the fire of his lifework. In his eight years as a Seattle resident, he performed poetry at nearly every venue hosted in dive bars and cafés in the city. He also performed poetry for a stint on street corners at Seattle’s famous Pike Place Market. Before leaving Seattle, William designed a writer’s workshop that assists individuals to manufacture inspiration and instructed it at Seattle Central Community College. William currently resides in rural Oregon between the townships of Willamina and Grand Ronde where he plays with words on penheadpress.blogspot.com and is building an age old dream of starting a publishing business. Products, organizations, and pen names that (were created by and) belong to William James Lindberg: Poor Saps Press, Red Pen, Judah Fischer, pen head press, William James, Penhead Press, Randomly Accessed Poetics, and Penhead Comics.

William James Lindberg… Random Word Image Poetry

Image

 
 

Adios MoFo Cosmic Gossip

 
 

 
 
 

Explain Desperate Lock Paddle Song

 

 

Copyright © 2017 by William James Lindberg

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Howie Good… Text Object & All the Doo-dah Day

 

Text Object

Don’t come at night. God closes doors and then opens them right up. I start remembering all those incidents on the news. The violence. Teeth getting knocked out. I’m sick of this (expletive). The dog knew it was coming. He started barking and jumped off the bed. Then the house started shaking. It felt like I was on a boat in choppy seas. Someone asked, “Is it true that whenever you walk on the streets, you get stabbed?” My 85-year-old neighbor still remembers how painful it was. We’re not really going to know that, though, without some combination of a time machine and an experiment we can’t do.

 
 

All the Doo-dah Day

We’ve probably found the oldest smiley emoji. As for the interpretation, you may certainly choose your own. None of it makes sense. It’s like my legs have carried me here by themselves. We don’t have a grasp on what the mechanism is yet. The real soldiers wear rags on their faces. I’m looking, but I don’t see my child. Things happen to people, and people don’t really understand how easily those things can happen. First they’re an animal, then they’re a volcano, then they’re playing with their cat, then they’re making songs, then they don’t finish the song and they’re jumping into the void from an elevated point.

 

Howie Good, a journalism professor at SUNY New Paltz, is the author of The Loser’s Guide to Street Fighting, winner of the 2017 Lorien Prize for Poetry from Thoughtcrime Press, and Dangerous Acts Starring Unstable Elements, winner of the 2015 Press Americana Prize for Poetry. He co-edits White Knuckle Press with Dale Wisely.

 

Copyright © 2017 by Howie Good

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ashley Parker Owens… Flowers on the Lake & Twiggy

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Flowers on the Lake by Ashley Parker Owens

 
 

Twiggy by Ashley Parker Owens

 

Ashley Parker Owens is a writer, poet, and artist living in Richmond, Kentucky. She has an MFA in Creative Writing from Eastern Kentucky University, and an MFA in Visual Arts from Rutgers University.

Reach her at
@parkerowens twitter
https://www.zonerama.com/ashleyparkerowens/61449
https://ashleyparkerowens.wordpress.com/
https://www.facebook.com/parker.owens1?ref=bookmarks
https://www.virtualgallery.com/galleries/ashley_parker_owens_a43845277/landscapes_s16464
https://www.facebook.com/ashleyparkerowens/?ref=aymt_homepage_pan

Copyright © 2017 by Ashley Parker Owens

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Rajnish Mishra… Bowl’s Best Friend

 

Bowl’s Best Friend

 
Did you know that glass can store all acids but one?
Hydrofluoric acid eats glass up.
It’s called corrosion in chemistry.
Interesting sound: co-rro-sion,
and interestingly, it reduces weight.
What’s more, this villain of an acid
causes permanent tissue death on contact.
 
Hydrochloric acid is harmless, comparatively.
It’s stored in glass bottles, you see!
It’s a cousin of hydrofluoric, yes but does nothing
sinister: no glass corrosion nor permanent tissue death.
It’s so harmless that it’s produced and stored
in every body of every nation, in all civilizations
where humans have a stomach.
What does it do there?
It kills microbes there and does something to protein:
‘denature’ is the word in zoology.
Interesting sound: de-na-ture,
and interestingly, it’s natural.
 
It’s a good friend, this hydrochloric acid.
It’s a good servant too.
It can’t corrode glass and stomach wall
but does a good job over toilet bowls.
Corrosion gives the surface sheen,
removes the outermost layer in direct contact
with the world and filth with it.
 
To combine chemistry with zoology,
This mild ‘friendly’ thing denatures, corrodes,
combines with epidermal water,
releases heat, a lot of it, and severely burns
the largest organ in human body.
The standard instructions for its splash (accidental)
on skin are: ‘gently wipe it off, flush with water
and cover the area with a cloth moistened with baking soda’.
 
India, Pakistan, Bangladesh,
Uganda, Cambodia, Afghanistan,
Palestine, France, Israel,
Iran, Zanzibar, Indonesia,
Greece, China and UK,
man’s best friend has at least one active and direct use.
 
Revenge is the motive that malignity cites in confessions
and statements later, much later. So proves the self-justified rage,
of the self-righteous man, yes it’s always a man
who throws hydrochloric acid, the friendly, harmless servant of mankind,
and burns layers, fifteen to twenty, of epidermis,
generally of a woman’s face, in all the countries
where its active and direct use is reported.
 
Nobody thought of writing instructions
against its more direct (active, planned and common) use.
 

Rajnish Mishra is a poet, writer, translator and blogger born and brought up in Varanasi, India. He is the editor of PPP Ezine, a poetry ezine. He has a blog on poetry, poetics and aesthetic pleasure: https:/poetrypoeticspleasure.wordpress.com.

 

Copyright © 2017 by Rajnish Mishra

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Jared Pearce… Prognostication

 

Prognostication

On the day you came home
I am hustling one place
To another, sweating on
The air that won’t lift and won’t breathe,
 
And there are three blue jays
In the oak up third, younger,
I think, and quieter, chuffing
Softly and letting me near,
 
Fanning their tails to match
The blistered sky, looking askance
As I perambulate by. I hope
They’ll stay and believe
 
In the love and the need in me.
Yet the blue in them wasn’t heaven’s
Grace, but the blue of your eye,
The blue of deep space,
 
And without a shout, without
A race, they spread the day and hurtled away,
With nothing of cruelty
And nothing of hate.
 

Some of Jared Pearce’s poems have recently been or will soon be shared in Marathon, A Quiet Courage, DIAGRAM, Inlandia, and Poetic Diversity. His first collection is due from Aubade Press in 2018. He lives in Iowa.

 

Copyright © 2017 by Jared Pearce